Welcome Lisa A. Hammer, MD, IBCLC

Please join us in welcoming Lisa A. Hammer, MD, IBCLC, to IHA Breastfeeding Medicine Specialists. Dr. Hammer is a board-certified pediatrician and a lactation consultant. She has experience in pediatrics, lactation and postpartum support, and provides comprehensive breastfeeding consultations, addressing needs of both mothers and babies. She begins welcoming patients on Monday, March 21. Please contact your primary care physician or OB/GYN if you need a referral.

 

 

 

 

Scheduling sports physicals

Below is a listing of IHA’s pediatric and family medicine offices that are now scheduling annual check-ups. Beat the summer rush – don’t wait until the last minute to schedule your child’s check-up. Appointments are now available. Click the link below to make an appointment online, or call the office directly. If you schedule online, please select “physical” from the appointment type drop down menu.

Also, as a reminder, if your child is planning on participating in sports during the 2016 – 2017 school year, the Michigan High School Athletic Association (MHSAA) requires that they receive a sports physical after April 15, 2016.

 

Pediatrics

  • IHA Chelsea Pediatrics: book online or call 734.475.9175
  • IHA Child Health – Ann Arbor: book online or call 734.971.9344
  • IHA Child Health – Plymouth: book online or call 734.455.4600
  • IHA Livingston Pediatrics: book online or call 810.494.6820
  • IHA Pediatric Healthcare – Arbor Park: book online or call 734.434.3000
  • IHA Pediatric Healthcare – Canton: book online or call 734.398.7899
  • IHA Primary Pediatrics – Domino’s Farms: book online or call 734.769.3896

 

Family Medicine

  • IHA Ann Arbor Family Medicine: book online or call 734.761.2581
  • IHA Brighton Family Care: book online or call 810.494.6840
  • IHA Canton Family Medicine: book online or call 734.398.7880
  • IHA Chelsea Family & Internal Medicine: book online or call 734.475.8677
  • IHA Clinton Family Medicine: book online or call 517.456.7449
  • IHA Family & Internal Medicine – Howell: book online or call 517.338.9090
  • IHA Family Medicine – Arbor Park: book online or call 734.971.1188
  • IHA Milan Family & Internal Medicine: book online or call 734.439.2429
  • IHA Pinckney Family Medicine: book online or call 734.878.1000

 

Car seats: why do they expire and can I recycle them?

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As all parents and caretakers know, a car seat is mandatory for young children and infants. But what do you do when your child has outgrown their seat, or it’s expired or been in an accident? There are approximately 12 million car seats purchased in the US every year, many of those ending up in landfills once they’ve been retired.

90% of the materials, by weight, can be recycled. There are two locations in Ann Arbor that accept retired car seats for recycling, which are listed below.

Why does a car seat expire or become unusable after a car accident? They expire because the plastic materials they’re made of degrades over time from ultraviolet light, which weakens the effectiveness of the frame to withstand impact in a crash.

They’re unusable after an accident, even if they look fine, for similar reasons. Think of the car seat like an airbag- it’s there to save your child’s life. You have to replace your airbag after a crash because it can no longer withstand impact and help save your life- it’s only useful for one crash. A car seat is the same. It may look like it hasn’t sustained any damage, but there could be cracks or fractures in the plastic that puts your baby’s life at risk in the event of another crash.

To properly dispose of a car seat, you should strip the entire seat of the cover, the straps, disassemble everything and cut the straps. It’s also recommended you write all over the plastic base something like “EXPIRED” or “CRASHED” in permanent marker, to stop someone from trying to use it. There are two locations in Ann Arbor that accept car seats for recycling: Drop-off station on East Ellsworth, and the recovery yard on Jackson Road. For more information visit Recycle Ann Arbor.

M-14 Construction Information

 

Beginning Friday, March 4 at 9:00 pm, M-14 between Miller Road and Main Street will be shut down for construction. This closure is expected to last through summer and into the fall, which may impact your normal route to one of our office locations. Please allow yourself extra time to make it to your scheduled appointments.

In addition, if you are a patient at IHA Ann Arbor Family Medicine, IHA WestArbor Obstetrics & Gynecology, IHA WestArbor Internal Medicine or IHA Child Health – Ann Arbor, we are also aware that the construction may delay your drive time to your office when our new building, IHA WestArbor Medical Center, opens in late August.

Mdot’s interactive map will give you a closer look and other information about the project. Check it out here. 

Talking to Your Teen About Underage Drinking

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By the time they reach 8th grade, nearly 50% of all adolescents have had at least one alcoholic drink with over 20% report having been drunk. In addition to being illegal, underage drinking poses high risks. While your child is young, there are significant changes in the body, including rapid hormonal changes and the formation of new networks in the brain. Young adults are extremely vulnerable to alcohol-related brain damage. The immediate and long-term risks associated with underage drinking continue to show the need for prevention and treatment programs.

The 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey (link) of more than 13,000 high school students nationwide found that in the past 30 days:

  • 35% drank at least one drink containing alcohol
  • 21% drank five or more drinks containing alcohol
  • 6% drank 10 or more drinks containing alcohol in a row
  • 10% drove after drinking alcohol
  • 22% rode with a driver who have been drinking alcohol

As a parent, you should feel comfortable talking to your children about underage drinking, the risks and the consequences. Often, teens do not consider consequences when making choices like to drink underage, because they do not believe they could get in an accident, or drink so much they pass out. However, alcohol related crashes are greater for drivers aged 16-20 than drivers 21 and older.

Peer pressure plays a huge role in underage drinking, as well as how alcohol is portrayed in the media. Your relationship with your children, how you discipline them, how you communicate with them and your involvement in their life are all huge influences in their choice to drink underage – or not. Communicate with your children, be involved in their lives. Encourage their growing independence, but set appropriate limits. Make it easy for them to share information about their lives, and share information about yours. Perhaps you engaged in risky behavior as a teen that you would like to make sure they do not repeat. You could be open about your teenage years and experiences. But do not glamourize any underage drinking you may have done, and be sure to tell them about the great experiences you had without drinking.

Help your children practice ways to say no to their friends: “No thank you, I’m fine,” or “I’d rather be sober,” are great places to start. Set clear rules about alcohol use and enforce the rules you set.

You need to be a positive role model for your children as well. If you drink, drink responsibly. That means not too much or too often. Do not drive when you have been drinking. Get help if you think you have a problem. And do not give alcohol to your children.

If you have any questions about how to start the conversation with your children, ask their pediatrician. They may have suggestions or resources that will help you along the way.

 

Talking to Your Teen About Smoking

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Did you know that every day nearly 3,800 people younger than 18 smoke their first cigarette? According to the Department of Health and Human Services 2,100 youth who are occasional smokers become daily smokers every single day.

The harmful effects of nicotine in teenagers and young adults creates an important call to action for parents. Don’t wait to start the conversation about the hazards of smoking. If you yourself are a smoker, seek help to quit. 5.6 million children alive today (or 1 in every 13 children) will die early from smoking if we do not do more to reduce current smoking rates.

It may be a tough topic to talk about but it’s an important topic. Teens may be more concerned with the immediate impact smoking has on their lives than they are with their health in the future. Emphasize the immediate negative impacts. Remind them that:

  • Smoking around friends or siblings can be damaging, as secondhand smoke is known to be harmful. (Half of all children between ages 3 and 18 are exposed to cigarette smoke regularly).
  • Teens who smoke tend to be sick more often than their non-smoking peers, and may develop lung problems or have more asthma attacks. If your child is an athlete, this can harm their athletic performance.
  • Smoking has a negative effect on their personal appearance (bad breath, yellow teeth, wrinkly skin).
  • Smoking may lead to the use of alcohol and other drugs.

 

On the positive end, there are healthier ways to shine within a peer group, by saying no or through unique interests or hobbies. Also remind them about the long-term effects:

  • Tobacco use is the single most preventable cause of death in the US and in the world.
  • Smoking is well-known to cause heart disease, cancers and stroke.
  • Smoking decreases life expectancy.
  • Nicotine has negative effects on brain development which could have lasting effects on memory and attention.

 

Remind your child that smoking includes e-cigarettes and hookahs. Both have some of the same dangerous effects as cigarettes. Starting the discussion about smoking when your children are young and continuing it through their high school years is important. You, as the parent, are a role model and the greatest influence on your children’s lives. Set a positive example by quitting smoking if you currently smoke.

They will need consistent reinforcement, support and guidance. Knowing if your children’s friends smoke is important. You may be able to help them practice ways to say no. For example “No thanks – I’m good” or “Gross! Those things stink!”

Help your children understand that TV shows and movies may make smoking look “cool” when in reality it’s very harmful. Remind them it’s much harder to quit smoking than it is to start in the first place. Tell them stories about family members with health problems related to smoking, make it real.

Talking about smoking with your children may seem challenging, but it’s important. If you have questions, ask your child’s doctor for information that may help kick-start or continue the conversation.